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Now It’s Possible to Make Your Dreams Come True

“Unlike most initiatives out there which focus on crowdfunding projects, Posibl. focuses on those dreams we have that, so often because of our lack of contacts or resources, remain unfulfilled. We’ve created this platform because we believe that happiness is best achieved by strengthening collaboration and the practice of human values,” adds Parlato.

This undertaking of a small group of Argentine entrepreneurs — which has obtained first round financing that values the company at $2.5 million — underscores the positive side of globalization, a phenomenon which we often suffer from as a result of of domino-effect economic crises, pandemics, and cyber attacks that know no borders.

It is precisely this kind of initiative that reminds us that, as human beings, we are responsible for each other. That, as a society, the more we support one group’s dreams (the end of dictatorships in the Arab countries, for instance), the more we all benefit.

Coincidentally, in her latest blog, the writer Gilberta Caron speaks about the Tabonuco, a very tall tree native to Puerto Rico. Thanks to a strong root network, the Tabonuco tends to survive even the most violent hurricanes. It reminded me of how quickly solidarity expresses itself in the wake of tragedies such as Hurricane Sandy, which motivated millions of strangers to open their doors, donate time and money, and prepare warm meals for those affected by the storm.

But what happens to our dreams in our day-to-day life when we are not reminded by tragedy that we must take care of our dreams and, whenever possible, of the dreams of our fellow human beings?

Wouldn’t we build a much better world if, aided by technology that ignores borders, we created an unbreakable network of dream makers?

Now it is Posibl.

This article was originally published on Huffington Post. 

 

The Power of a Bilingual Brain

My friend and personal editor, Susan Landon (by now, my not-so-secret weapon), has had the biggest belly laughs and hair pulling episodes while editing my blogs, columns, books and anything else I throw her way. And, as I believe in the literary adage “show, don’t tell,” here is one of our latest exchanges to help you fully appreciate my grammatical handicap.

I sent Susan a new Op-Ed, which I had originally entitled: “Black Woman on the Golf Course.” (Admittedly, I had previously checked via phone with her that it was “on the golf course.”) My subject line, however, read: “Black woman in the golf course.”

Susan – It’s ON the golf course!!!!

Me – Sorry, wrong subject line but the title is correct. Did you notice I used your favorite word “eschew”?

Susan – Yes, I noticed “eschew” and I wondered where on (not IN) earth that came from!! You are really stretching your wings. 🙂

Me – You are such a great influence in me!

Susan – It’s: influence ON me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I can’t catch a break.

In my defense, (and the defense of many second language learners!) there’s little rhyme or reason for the grammatical rules of these two little devils. You wait in line at the store but you’re online on the Internet. Someone is on your side but in your mind. They are on your team but in your heart. Something is on TV, on the radio and on a website, but it’s in a book. It’s on a continent but in a country; in Manhattan but on Long Island. Come on! (Or should I go with “Come in, take a seat. Experience life as a second language learner!”)

Over the years, I have repeatedly studied the many rules that regulate prepositions trying to discover the patterns that elude me to no avail. So, I decided to settle for the second best thing besides speaking prepositionally-perfect English: Knowing that being a frequent user of both Spanish and English delays the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, makes me better at multitasking, and allows me to be keenly aware of what’s important and what’s not at every moment.

In a recent interview with the New York Times, Ellen Bialystok, a cognitive neuroscientist who has spent 40 years learning about how bilingualism sharpens the mind, says that, according to her research, 5 and 6 year-olds who are bilingual “manifest a cognitive system with the ability to attend to important information and ignore the less important.” How does that work? Dr. Bialystok explains:

“There’s a system in your brain, the executive control system. It’s a general manager. Its job is to keep you focused on what’s relevant, while ignoring distractions. It’s what makes it possible for you to hold two different things in your mind at one time and switch between them. If you have two languages and you use them regularly, the way the brain’s networks work is that every time you speak, both languages pop up and the executive control system has to sort through everything and attend to what’s relevant in the moment. Therefore the bilinguals use that system more, and it’s that regular use that makes that system more efficient.”

After reading this interview a few months ago, I felt a little bit better about my failures and began to plot a strategy. I was thinking of just mumbling something that sounds in-between on/in something like… “en” (which is the preposition we use in Spanish for both “in and on”) so nobody can tell which preposition I’m using. I was getting ready to start using my new solution when Susan called me out on doing something similar with two other pairs of words.

Susan – “Do you know the difference between ‘run’ and ‘ran’ and between ‘hang out’ and ‘hung out’? Because you always seem to mumble them and I always wonder which one you meant. I’m starting to think that you just don’t know which one is which.”

Me – “I just go with the same pronunciation for both because I can’t hear the difference between the present and the past tense and I can’t be bothered.”

Susan – “Well, that’s like me saying ‘ella fui a su casa’ instead of ‘ella fue a su casa’ and telling you I can’t be bothered,” she said using as an example the wrong conjugation of the verb “to go” in Spanish. Now that got my attention.

So, I’ve decided to practice my pronunciation of present and past tense for these two verbs because I believe the tense of the verb is often critical to understanding the meaning of what you’re saying.

But when it comes to on/in, I’ll let that slide in support of Dr. Bialystok’s research. It’s now obvious to me that my bilingual brain doesn’t identify those two as relevant information.

This article was first published in the Huffington Post.